Herzberg and Plenary Speakers 2020

Herzberg Public Lecture Speaker | Mon, June 8 @ 19h30

Dr. Donna Strickland | University of Waterloo
“Generating High-Intensity, Ultra-short Optical Pulses”
With the invention of lasers, the intensity of a light wave was increased by orders of magnitude overHeadshot of Dr. Donna Strickland, 2018 Nobel Prize Winner in Physics. what had been achieved with a light bulb or sunlight. This much higher intensity led to new phenomena being observed, such as violet light coming out when red light went into the material. After Gérard Mourou and I developed chirped pulse amplification, also known as CPA, the intensity again increased by more than a factor of 1,000 and it once again made new types of interactions possible between light and matter. We developed a laser that could deliver short pulses of light that knocked the electrons off their atoms. This new understanding of laser-matter interactions, led to the development of new machining techniques that are used in laser eye surgery or micromachining of glass used in cell phones.

Donna Strickland is a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Waterloo and is one of the recipients of the Nobel Prize in Physics 2018 for developing chirped pulse amplification with Gérard Mourou, her PhD supervisor at the time. They published this Nobel-winning research in 1985 when Strickland was a PhD student at the University of Rochester in New York state. Together they paved the way toward the most intense laser pulses ever created. The research has several applications today in industry and medicine — including the cutting of a patient’s cornea in laser eye surgery, and the machining of small glass parts for use in cell phones.

Strickland was a research associate at the National Research Council Canada, a physicist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and a member of technical staff at Princeton University. In 1997, she joined the University of Waterloo, where her ultrafast laser group develops high-intensity laser systems for nonlinear optics investigations.

Strickland was named a Companion of the Order of Canada. She is a recipient of a Sloan Research Fellowship, a Premier’s Research Excellence Award and a Cottrell Scholar Award.  She received the Rochester Distinguished Scholar Award and the Eastman Medal from the University of Rochester. Strickland served as the president of the Optical Society (OSA) in 2013 and is a fellow of OSA, the Royal Society of Canada, and SPIE (International Society for Optics and Photonics). She is an honorary fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering as well as the Institute of Physics. She received the Golden Plate Award from the Academy of Achievement and holds numerous honorary doctorates.

Strickland earned a PhD in optics from the University of Rochester and a B.Eng. from McMaster University.

Plenary Speakers

Mon, June 8 | 8h45

Avery Broderick | University of Waterloo

 

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Mon, June 8 | 9h30

David Jenkins | University of York

 

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Mon, June 8 | 15h15

CAP Teaching Medal Winner | TBD

 

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Mon, June 8 | 15h45

CAP Lifetime Achievement Medal Winner | TBD

 

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Wed, June 10 | 8h30

Alessandra Lanzara |  Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

 

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Wed, June 10 | 9h15

CAP Herzberg Medal Winner | TBD

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Wed, June 10 | 9h45

CAP Brockhouse Medal Winner | TBD

 

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Wed, June 10 | 16h45

Brian Wilson | University of Toronto

“Cancer and Light: How optical sciences and engineering impact cancer research and patient care”

The multiple interactions of light with biomolecules, cells and tissues enable established and emerging techniques and technologies used in cancer research and patient care. These approaches range from simple, point-of-care devices to complex, multifunctional platforms combined with complementary non-optical methods, including nanotechnologies, robotics, bioinformatics and machine learning. This seminar will use specific examples from current research to illustrate the biophysical and biological principles underlying the emerging fields of “onco-photonics” or “photo-oncology”.

Brian C Wilson holds a PhD in High-Energy Physics from University of Glasgow. His subsequent career has been in biomedical research and clinical service, initially in radiological diagnostics and therapeutics. Since moving to Canada in 1981, he has focused on research and clinical translation of optical techniques and, more recently, also photonic nanotechnologies for cancer diagnostics, light-based therapies and optical spectroscopy/imaging-guided interventions. He is currently Senior Scientist at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Professor of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto. He has published over 400 peer-reviewed research papers and trained over 50 graduate students and postdoctoral/clinical fellows. He has held visiting professorships in the US, Brazil, Australia and China and has won several national and international awards, both in oncology and in optics/photonics. He is an OSA and SPIE Fellow. He has co-founded 3 companies in the field on biomedical optics.

 

 

Thu, June 11 | 8h30

Renée Horton | NASA

 

Abstract details coming soon

 

Dr. K. Renee Horton was named a 2019 Louisianian of the year featured in the Louisiana Life magazine. She is honored in a group of nine individuals who stand out in their professions, give back and represent what’s best about Louisiana. She is an advocate for diversity and inclusion in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), and works diligently in the community for STEM education and STEM outreach. Renee believes in changing the face of STEM. She is the founder of Unapologetically Being, Inc., a nonprofit for advocacy and mentoring in STEM.
Renee is a compelling and international inspirational speaker who brings her epic personal story, expertise, and incredible personality to each of her award-winning presentations. Renee has spoken all over the world including South Africa, Brazil, South Korea, Canada, Jamaica and Mexico. She has served as an invited speaker for the first International Women and Girls Day at the United Nations, Dow Chemical Black History Speaker, keynote for Festigal Empowerment Luncheon, the National Air and Space Museum, Essence Power Stage, LSU Engineering commencement, numerous youth groups, just to name a few.
She is a native of Baton Rouge, Louisiana and is a graduate of Louisiana State University and with a Ph.D. in Material Science with a concentration in Physics from the University of Alabama, as the first African American to receive this degree. In her day job, she serves as a NASA Space Launch System (SLS) Quality Engineer at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) in New Orleans. Throughout her academic career, Renee has received numerous accolades and awards including the Black Engineer of the Year Trailblazer Award in 2011.
In 2016, Renee was elected President of the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP) as the second woman to hold the office. She has served the physics community abroad as a member of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) Women in Physics Working Group and currently serves on several advisory boards dedicated to a more diverse inclusion in physics. In 2017, she was elevated to a Fellow in the NSBP, which is the highest honor bestowed upon a member and in 2018 was inducted into Sigma Pi Sigma, the prestige honor society in physics.
She is the author of Dr. H Explores the Universe, a children’s series, Dr. H and her Friends, and Dr. H Explores the ABCs. Renee recently was named the Silver Anniversary Artie Literature Award winner for 2018, from New Orleans Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc, her published works. She is a proud member Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., as well as the proud mother of three and grandmother of two.

Thu, June 11 | 9h15

CAO-TRIUMF Vogt Medal Winner | TBD
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Thu, June 11 | 9h45

CAP-INO Medal Winner | TBD

 

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Thu, June 11 | 9h45

CAP-CRM Prize Winner | TBD 
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Thu, June 11 | 17h15

Deborah Harris | York University, Fermilab

“Neutrino Interferometry at DUNE”

The fact that neutrinos have mass and oscillate means that we can learn a great deal about them by studying what are effectively interference patterns that arise after neutrinos propagate over hundreds of kilometers.  The DUNE experiment will measure these interference patterns over a broad neutrino energy range after neutrinos have propagated 1300km.  In addition, DUNE will use a detector technology that provides exquisite detail about the interactions that make up the interference pattern.  This talk will present the current state of neutrino oscillation measurements and how the field is preparing for the next big jump in our understanding of neutrinos and the role they play in the universe.

Deborah Harris holds a joint position as a professor at York University in Toronto and a scientist at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in the United States.    Harris received her Ph.D. in High-Energy Physics from the University of Chicago in 1994.  As a Research Associate at the University of Rochester she used high energy (100GeV) neutrinos to better understand the weak force.  Harris was a staff scientist at Fermilab for 19 years and used lower energy (few GeV) neutrinos to better understand neutrinos themselves:  how they oscillate, and how they interact. Since 2010 she has served as the scientific co-Spokesperson of MINERvA, an experiment based at Fermilab that aims to understand neutrino interactions and the role the nucleus plays in those interactions.  Harris is now working on both MINERvA and T2K, in preparation for the DUNE experiment which aims to measure neutrino oscillations over a very long baseline using Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber technology.