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CAP Medal and Award Winners

CAP Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Physics

This medal is awarded on the basis of: Distinguished service to physics over an extended period of time, and/or; Recent outstanding achievement. The CAP Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Physics was introduced in 1956 and is awarded annually. The recipient must have spent the major part of his/her working career in Canada.

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The 2017 CAP Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Physics is awarded to

Mark Sutton, McGill University, for pioneering the development of coherent and time-resolved X-ray scattering techniques for the study of materials, and his resulting contributions to our understanding of materials and phase transitions.

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The 2016 CAP Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Physics is awarded to

Gilles Fontaine, Université de Montréal, for his pioneering, world-renowned work in theoretical and observational studies of white dwarf stars and the late stages of stellar evolution, including major contributions to the equation of state for white dwarfs and investigations of pulsating compact stars, as well as the discovery of a new class of subdwarf pulsators. His leadership has built what is arguably the preeminent group in the world in this field.

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The 2015 CAP Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Physics is awarded to

John F. Martin, University of Toronto / IPP, for his contributions to experimental particle physics and his leadership role in the international physics community.

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The 2014 CAP Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Physics is awarded to

André-Marie Tremblay, Université de Sherbrooke, for his pioneering work in the theory of Quantum Materials.

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The 2013 CAP Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Physics is awarded to

David John Lockwood, National Research Council, for his distinguished and sustained contributions to the elucidation of the optical properties of solids, low-dimensional semiconductor systems, and in particular light-emission from silicon, as well as his contributions to the advancement of physics in Canada and worldwide.

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The 2012 CAP Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Physics is awarded to

Gordon W. Semenoff, University of British Columbia, for his seminal contributions to quantum field theory, statistical mechanics and condensed matter physics.

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The 2011 CAP Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Physics is awarded to

See L. Chin, Université Laval, for his outstanding contributions to ultrafast intense laser science.

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The 2010 CAP Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Physics is awarded to

J. Richard Bond, Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, for his broad and fundamental contributions to cosmology and astrophysics, and his leadership which has contributed greatly to Canada's well-recognized efforts in these areas. He has developed the study of fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background into a powerful tool for the understanding of the structure and history of our universe.

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The 2009 CAP Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Physics is awarded to

Richard Peltier, University of Toronto, for his seminal contributions to understanding the physics of the earth, including glacial isostatic adjustment, mantle convection, fluid dynamics of the atmosphere and oceans, and global climate variability.

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The 2008 CAP Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Physics is awarded to

Louis Taillefer, Universite de Sherbrooke, for his strong leadership in condensed matter research, resulting in the discovery of multi-component superconductivity, the first observed violation of the Wiedemann-Franz universal ratio of charge and heat conductivities, and an experimental breakthrough in high-temperature superconductors, where quantum oscillations were discovered.

Press release coming soon.
Click here for a complete list of the previous winners of the Achievement